Protect Roberts Creek Headwaters Ancient Forest

At October 22, 2013 – SUCCESS THIS FOREST HAS BEEN PROTECTED – THANK YOU

ELF Press Release RC Headwaters Ancient Forest Protected

…more below

These Forests Are Worth Saving and We Need Your Help.

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Continued from the Home Page Introduction… Read more below…

SUCCESS THIS FOREST HAS BEEN PROTECTED
On October 22, 2013 – ELF Received notice from BCTS that they have removed DK045 from their harvest plans and will not be pursuing this area.  BCTS says, “You advanced some compelling arguments for preserving this stand of timber that we considered and concluded had reasonable merit…”
THANK YOU TO ALL THAT SUPPORTED US IN THE EFFORTS TO PROTECT THIS ANCIENT FOREST. A FORMAL PRESS RELEASE WILL FOLLOW SHORTLY – STAY TUNED – MORE NEWS TO COME.

September 2013 – the Fight To Save This Forest Continues

Another Gallery of Photos – Thanks To The Ancient Forest Alliance

September 30, 2012SEE Status Updates For the latest news on a new Archaeological discovery lying within the Roberts Creek Headwaters Ancient Forest.

JUNE 20, 2012 – Elphinstone Logging Focus (ELF) has conducted an expedition into the headwaters of Roberts Creek (Sunshine Coast) and located a proposed BC Timber Sales Cutblock A84612 (DK045). There are 2 headwater tributaries in this area that make up the main channel of Roberts Creek which eventually flows into the Salish Sea. One of the tributaries that ELF followed runs off the back side of Mt. Elphinstone. The surveyed cutblock and logging road is across steep terrain and encompasses an Age Class 9 (old growth) forest.

“From studying maps we found out that the cutblock is located between 2 Wildlife Habitat Areas (WHA). The BCTS logging would split this WHA in half”, states Ross Muirhead of Elphinstone Logging Focus (ELF) a Sunshine Coast forest protection group.

Protect Roberts Creek Headwaters Ancient Forest“This WHA was established to protect the Marbled Murrelet seabird which nests only in old- growth forests. Outside of this proposed cutblock and the WHA, the majority of the surrounding Age Classes on the high slopes of Mt. Elphinstone are rated at Age Class 2 – between 20-40 years old. This is the closest old growth yellow cedar to Highway 101 and thus holds awesome tourism potential due to its high ecological values.

One of the highest populations of Pacific Yew is found at site, with clusters of 4-5 Yews growing at the bases of the giant Yellow Cedars.

BCTS had originally said they will sell this block in the Fall of 2012 (Now moved up to August 15, 2012 as the latest approximate sales date) – we say this Crown land needs protection”. Muirhead adds.  Two parcels in the A84612 block on Dakota Ridge were granted Old Growth Mangement Area (OGMA) status by BCTS several months ago after ELF brought their possible destruction to the attention of the community.

ELF is calling block DK045 ‘The Roberts Creek Headwaters Ancient Forest’ given that the water source for Roberts Creek begins here and that trees in this forest range from 250- 1000 years old.

Hans Penner of ELF notes, “It would be a travesty if this forest is logged. Logging it also poses a high risk to downstream fisheries and water users on the lower reaches of Roberts Creek. We will be sketching out a trail as soon as possible into this forest so that community members can get in and see this amazing forest. It is hard to believe that logging these rare yellow cedar forests is even being considered in this day and age. Roberts Creek residents will be shocked to learn that the headwaters of their namesake creek could be wiped out with unknown long term consequences”.

Elphinstone Logging Focus is calling on BCTS’ senior Forest Planners to place this parcel into an OGMA, thus ensuring a connection between the two Wildlife Habitat Areas, ensuring that a heritage-ancient forest remains intact, and the protection of the headwaters to Roberts Creek is guaranteed for generations to come.

These Forests Are Worth Saving and We Need Your Help.

Your Voice Counts!

Click Here To Take Action Now

 

Help Protect the Last of the Old Growth and Natural Mt. Elphinstone Forests!

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